Month: April 2020

Game Dev Tycoon

Initially, you start in the early 1980s in your garage with no employees, limited money and a limited amount of choices. As you make more games and gain more money, more options are unlocked such as new consoles and the ability to create your first game engine. With making more games, you will gain more research points to research new topics and choices and your game development skills will improve. After amassing over $1 million, you can upgrade to a new office and starts hiring your first employees which can help you make better games. After making more hit titles, you will be able to move into even larger offices and hire more employees to develop more larger and sophisticated games.

When you are creating your first game, you have to think of a name, a genre and a topic of choice. Each genre and topic combination has different effects on the sales of your game. Next, you are brought to a menu of choices where you can adjust the bars to match what you think the game should include. In the first stage, you have to adjust the time spent on the engine, gameplay and the story/quests. The next stage includes the dialogue, level design and AI. The last stage includes the world design, graphics and sound. The amount of time spent on one aspect versus another can affect how your game would turn out. When you are finished, you will see how reviewers rate your game and how much money in sales have you made and you have just created your first game.


Info of MediEvil Review

MediEvil takes place in 13th century England, where the Kingdom of Gallowmere is invaded by an evil sorcerer named Zarok who steals the souls of all the villagers and turns them into a zombie army. Zarok’s energy also revives a dead champion knight named Sir Dan Fortesque. Fortesque was widely believed to be the hero of the first battle against Zarok, but he finds out he was the first to die, and his reputation is based on a lie. Knowing the only way he’ll be sent to the hall of heroes, Fortesque goes to defeat Zarok for one final time.

The settings of the game are in the kingdom of Gallowmere. MediEvil is a platform game so each level has secret challenges and areas to find. The levels are fairly large, and for the most part do a good job of creating a creepy vibe. The environment’s are all dark and full of coffins and other things of that nature. There are a lot of blocky textures, but it’s expected since this game came out back in 1998. However, the graphics are definitely a weak point for MediEvil. Dan’s movements aren’t fluid at all, and his attacks are all choppy and don’t have a natural ebb and flow other games such as Spyro and Tomb Raider. Also the enemies are very blurry, and could’ve been made more scary. Like I said before, the graphics definitely aren’t a strong suite of this game. However, since this was made in 1998 it’s unfair to really bash them too bad. The sound is good for the most part, some sounds are generic, but the music is surprisingly good.

Graphics: 3/10

Sound/Music: 3/10

Story/Setting: 6/10

Controls and Gameplay

The gameplay of MediEvil is both a strength of the game and a weakness. The gameplay is very simple, but it doesn’t do anything revolutionary. The game is third person, and you control Sir Dan Fortesque and navigate through levels searching for keys to unlock doors, and other items. You can fight zombies and other enemies with a variety of weapons that include swords, throwing knives, clubs, and more. The levels are all fairly big, but can become repetitive. In each level there is a “chalice” that is awarded if you beat 100% of the level. Beating a level is done by defeating all the enemies, and exploring the whole area. This can be both fun and frustrating. It’s good if you like searching and finding things in a game. If you just want a quick playthrough, it’s annoying when you think you’ve beaten the whole level but the progress bar isn’t showing 100%.

The enemies you face are mostly zombies but there are other creatures as well. The fights are very easy, but they do get progressively harder. I wouldn’t say anything in the game is particularly difficult though. The game feels just like any other platform game. The controls are fairly standard, with movement done with the directional pad. The square button is used for power attacks, circle lets you jump, X is used for short, quick attacks, and triangle allows Sir Daniel Fortesque to block attacks. One major problem with the controls is running, in the game running is done by tapping the directional pad twice and holding it down. It can become annoying getting a fight and than having to double tap to run. Another major problem is selecting a weapon from the inventory, you have to continuously press select to access the inventory. It would have been better if Sony just allowed you to access weapons without having to press select. Also, the camera angles in the game are terrible. Naturally, since the game is third person

Controls: 5/10

Gameplay: 5/10

Rent or Buy? Final Thoughts

MediEvil is one of those games that was great when it came out, but hasn’t aged gracefully. If you played this game when it new, than I’d recommend getting it purely for the nostalgia trip. I played this game in 1999, and I don’t regret buying it because I enjoyed it as a child back than. But from an unbiased point of view, the graphics are blocky and the textures don’t look good, the character movement and camera angles are jerky, and overall it has very repetitive gameplay. I’d honestly not recommend you buy this game if it’s your first time hearing about it.

Breakdown

Graphics: 3/10

Sound/Music: 3/10

Story/Setting: 6/10

Controls: 5/10

Gameplay: 5/10

Overall: 6/10.


Dragon Age

The World

Players encounter a whole new world in Dragon Age Origins, filled with weird and wonderful races, the Quinari for example, and enemies to take on, and a mythology that has deeper roots than some well-established RPG’s which have been around for longer. There are many areas in the game which introduce elements never considered by other games, such as The Circle. This is the central hub for all those with magical powers, asserting control over those who practice the dark arts and training others to use the light arts well.

The Mythology

The mythology in the game is still celebrated as some of the deepest in gaming history. The world is littered with various volumes on certain aspects of the game, offering the player who chooses to read them all the wealth of knowledge of an entire world. As far as the core history goes, a group of mages attempted to enter the game’s version of heaven, and when they did they tainted it with their darkness and desire for power. As a result all of the beings, thought to be gods, living in the realm became dark beasts, which were buried deep underground by the dwarves. The Darkspawn, creatures tainted by this darkness, seek out these gods and once every few hundred years do find one, known as an Arch Daemon. These old gods must be destroyed to stop the Darkspawn spreading across the world, and every time they find one of their gods the ensuing rampage is known as a blight.

The Heroes

The Grey Wardens are the heroes of Dragon Age Origins, a group of warriors from all races which have consumed Darkspawn blood and survived its effects, making them stronger. Players create a character which becomes a Grey Warden in the game, and so follow the current blight to its end, in which they must kill the Arch Daemon. Interestingly the Grey Warden to kill the Arch Daemon will also themselves die, and a choice is offered to players before they kill it which allows them to choose to live on or die a hero.

The Characters And Choices

The main characters in the game are a group of warriors from across the races in the game. Players interact with each of these characters in their hub area between quests, making for some very touching and often comedic conversations. This is where Dragon Age Origins opens up, because players can make other characters either love or hate them, each achieving specific abilities within them. The choices given to players range from the trivial to the unbelievable, often resulting in irreversible, world changing effects.