The most popular motor club in the United States thinks so. Drivers aged fifty or older are eligible for a member’s discount on a software package that is essentially a video game. The program is engineered to train elderly drivers with exercises designed to improve motor skills, awareness and reaction time. Since brain fitness, vision and other skills critical to driving tend to decline with age, there is good reason for older individuals to use such games to sharpen their abilities.

Other companies are experimenting with similar programs to assist teenagers just learning to drive. Improved awareness and faster decision making are just a few of the benefits that have been proven to result from gaming. Software is even used to help young people with cognitive difficulties and mental illnesses.

University studies have shown that electronic games can help children develop motor skills. Another study explored the effects of video games on surgeons who utilize tiny tools and small incisions. Those who played more demonstrated more accuracy and control. On the other end of the scalpel, gaming has been shown to reduce stress and even help eliminate the perception of pain in medical patients. Another recent study suggests that playing can improve eyesight by more than fifty percent.

So, can car games make you a better driver? Can bike games make you a better rider? The verdict seems to be positive. While a virtual world can’t replace real behind-the-wheel experience, practicing on a computer has definite benefits that translate to the real world.

Bike games can be just as effective as those that feature automobiles. After all, the same skills are required: fast reflexes, keen awareness, sharp eyes and even problem solving. Whatever you preferred the mode of transportation, your driving may benefit from some play. You can enjoy fast-paced action and hours of fun, confident that you are doing more than “just playing” as you develop your abilities to navigate a real vehicle.